the binary marketing show

10th Annual EP Winner

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Record Label: n/a
www.binarymarketingshow.com

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Home Base: Formerly Queens, NY. Now our home is a mid-nineties Jeep Cherokee touring from town to town on this planet, Earth.

Genre: We make experimental music. Truly experimental. Not exclusively drone or noise. We experiment with sounds and tones but also song structures and styles.

Category Entered: EP

Work submitted: Clues From the Past

Label: We’re involved with a record collective (not label) called the 8088 Record Collective and Dive Records based out of Brooklyn. Jim Santo is a nice fellow with an amazing recording studio that handles Dive Records. Look up his band, The Sharp Things.

URLs:
http://binarymarketingshow.com
http://facebook.com/thebinarymarketingshow

Influences: Carl Jung, Ennio Morricone, Clara Rockmore, Joseph Campbell, Phillip Glass, Sergei Prokofiev, David Lynch, Goblin, This Heat, Robert Moog, Broadcast, InEveryRoom, Bird Names, our parents, family, and the generations of people that created. us.

What is the meaning of your band name? It’s a personal mythology.

Describe your nominated work: Our work is an EP that we recorded in our old house in 2010.

Why did you choose to submit this work to The 10th IMA’s? A friend recommended us.

Did you use any unusual effects or instruments in this recording? Yes. We built a small tube amplifier and delay circuit taken from a small integrated circuit originally designed to supply surround sound effect on VHS players.

Were there any happy accidents while in the studio, or did everything go as planned? Our creative process thrives on happy accidents, as does all of reality really regardless of what we tend to think as people. We get ideas and try them out, but it’s the act of playing them and listening to them that really determines how we structure the songs. Sometimes they just come right out without any really provocation and other times we get into splicing and editing with samplers and creating songs from the remnants of other songs.

Did fans help you fund this project? Yes. There are some nice people out there that make large contributions to our work.

What makes your fans unique? Some of our fans aren’t human.

Are there any songs you wish you wrote: No. That’s silly.

What artists are you listening to that would surprise your fans? I don’t think people are surprised by much of anything these days.

What is your dream show lineup? Well the dreams we’ve had with elements of musical performance playing a large role aren’t sometimes an experience we’d care to repeat or bring to fruition in a real setting. Shows with our creative friends, however, are more fulfilling. We’ve had quite a few of them and creating with friends is more like lucid dreaming.

What are your guilty pleasures on the road? A lot of people might say that being on the road is a guilty pleasure itself.

Any close calls or mishaps while on tour? Tour is a series of mishaps and hookups. We’ve were stranded in Elyria, Ohio for a week waiting on a part for our dear old Cherokee .

Do you have any backstage rituals or routines before you go on stage? Not really. Breathing, feeling out our surroundings

Should music be free? Of course music should be free. Art is food and everyone’s got to eat.

How has digital affected your career? Digital has allowed us to create without having to use and consume lots of equipment. We’re originally fans of tape and analog in terms of the recording process, but digital allows anyone to record anywhere on small amounts of equipment, consumes less power, and has the ability to produce less waste. The audio gear producing industry could do a lot better by designing products that have longevity and are easily repaired, but it’s a start at least.

Are digital singles vs. full albums the future of music? No. I think that’s been proven.

Finish this sentence: The music industry is… an industry now run by anyone. Does it still qualify as an industry??